Friday, May 14, 2010

Hope and Physical Therapy

I know there’s been a lack of running posts recently. One reason is because I’ve been pouring my running-thoughts into my Examiner page (please subscribe, or at least check it out!). But the real reason is that I haven’t been running.

And trust me, no one is more upset about this than I am.

This is the longest-lasting running problem I’ve ever had. I kept thinking it was getting better, that it must be getting better. But no. 

My most recent recovery plan was given to me by my college athletic trainer in Boston (I actually do more there than just eat dessert): one week off completely, two weeks of cross training. So I did that, then went out for a test run only to learn that nothing had changed. No better. No worse.

 ArrrrggggggGaaaaaahhhhhhhhhh.

What’s a runner to do?

Answer: Descend onto a deep dark pit of misery.

And deep and dark this pit was. (I’m not recommending this. Just stating a fact.)

I mean, it got to the point where I was walking down the street in my fat pants (ugh that hurts to write, but not running + this = fatpants. Let’s be real here.), and hating anyone and everyone who was out running. From casual joggers with fanny packs to elite athletes, I hate them all. Because they can run and I can’t.

I don’t absolutely 100% need running. I can be a person without it. (Though I do have a hard time being my usual pleasant self.) But I love running, and I don’t like being without it.

BUT as of Tuesday night, there’s hope again! My pelvis might be tilted. (OMG turns out The Importance of Being Even may apply to my hips!) And doing these physical therapy exercises twice a day (and biking – ugh, kill me) might be the fix I need.

I’m not going to cry Miracle! until I’m out on a 100% pain-free run…but let’s just say I’m hopeful. Things are starting to look up.

Read more about pelvic biomechanics here

• Lie on involved side.

• Bend knee of upper leg, placing foot flat on floor in front of lower leg.

• Keep involved leg straight.

• Lift leg upward.

• Return to starting position.

Perform 2 sets of 10 Repetitions, once a day.

Perform 1 repetition every 4 Seconds.


• Lie on right side with knees bent, feet together.

• Lift left knee upward.

• Lower and repeat.

• Repeat exercise lying on left side.

Perform 2 sets of 10 Repetitions, once a day.

Rest 1 Minute between sets.

Perform 1 repetition every 4 Seconds.



• Lie on uninvolved side, with lower knee bent for stability.

• Keep knee straight on involved leg, lifting leg upward.

• Return to start position and repeat.

Do not roll trunk forward or backward.

Perform 2 sets of 10 Repetitions, once a day.

Perform 1 repetition every 4 Seconds.



• Half kneel next to chair as shown with left leg up.

• Rotate kneeling leg outward.

• Place right hand on muscles on side of right thigh.

• Flatten back by tightening abdominal muscles.

• Move hips forward and shift hips to the right until a stretch is felt in outside

of right thigh.

• Repeat for left leg.

Perform 1 set of 4 Repetitions, once a day.

Hold exercise for 20 Seconds.


• Lie on table or firm bench with half of your thighs off table.

• Position both knees on chest.

• Flatten back against table.

• Lower left leg while holding right leg to chest.

• Return to start position.

• Repeat with other leg.

Do not allow leg on chest to fall outward.

Perform 1 set of 4 Repetitions, once a day.

Hold exercise for 20 Seconds.

• Lie on back with one knee bent.

• Lift buttocks off floor.

• Return to start position.

Maintain neutral spine.

Perform three sets with each leg.

Perform 2 sets of 10 Repetitions, once a day.

Rest 1 Minute between sets.

Perform 1 repetition every 4 Seconds.


• Lie on back, knees bent, arms at side, feet flat on floor.

• Begin in neutral spine.

• Inhale, and start at tail bone and raise on spinal segment at a time until

weight is supported on feet and shoulders.

• Exhale and lower one spinal segment at a time starting from the upper

segments to the tail bone.

• Repeat.

Perform 2 sets of 10 Repetitions, once a day.

Rest 1 Minute between sets.


• Lie face down, knee bent on involved leg.

• Lift leg upward.

• Return to starting position.

Perform 2 sets of 10 Repetitions, once a day.

Rest 1 Minute between sets.

Perform 1 repetition every 4 Seconds.


And I guess I should say: These exercises were designed for me and are to be used only under the direction of a licensed, qualified professional. 

But do what you want.

5 comments:

  1. I'm a fan of glaringly longingly at the people jogging at 8am while I'm on my way to work. Not about injury (at the moment), just about being short on time and wishing my work started at 10am!

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  2. This is a little off subject, but I've been trying to give my knees a break and I'm wondering what your opinion is of the elliptic trainer. I think you've already expressed your disdain of treadmills and I hate to exercise inside but....anyway...my joints are thanking me at least.

    Any thoughts?

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  3. Well, I actually hate the elliptical with a burning passion...more because I'm unreasonably afraid of it (for some reason it makes me feel like my knees are going to lock backwards)...

    BUT it is good for cross-training, though I think if your problem is impact, then the pool is the place to be.

    Like most cross-training, it's hard to get a good workout on the elliptical. You may think you're working, but unless you're out of breath and sweating (like you would be on a run), you're probably not getting much out of it. So just be conscientious of that!

    Also, when was the last time you got new shoes? A lot of knee problems can be fixed by new shoes/better-fitting shoes, or orthodics!

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  4. Thanks Mollie. I agree with the pool bit, but I'd have to find a new place to workout in order to get access to one. I just concluded it was too inconvenient. (sorry for putting lame excuses on your blog.)

    I try to be conscious of the intensity, I've just gotten into the habit of hanging my hat on my heart rate: it it's high enough, I'm working hard enough.

    I just recently replaced my shoes. (I'm addicted to the Asics GT series...) I usually get new ones every six months or so and my old ones were getting a little long in the tooth.

    To me, I think I just feel old. ugh - I know that's a crappy excuse because so many people who are older than me seem to put up with milage just fine. But I can't stand feeling like I need to take a day off after every five miler. (which I have been...)

    Thanks.

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  5. I hope you start feeling better! I have similar exercises as you... in time, all will be better :)

    xxMK
    Delightful Bitefuls

    ReplyDelete